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Writing and Citing

Writing and Citing

What is citing sources? Why do I have to do it?

Citing sources is the process by which you give attribution to the authors/creators of the information you use in your research. This helps you avoid unintentionally plagiarizing the work of another. Citations will appear within the body of your paper and at the end in the form of a bibliography, works cited, or references page. Most academic disciplines use a different style for citing sources. Commonly used citation styles include the American Psychological Association (APA) style, Modern Language Association (MLA) style, Chicago & Turabian styles, Council of Science Editors (CSE) style, and more. 

Citing your sources is much more than just providing attribution, however. Your citations place your research in context. It shows that you are aware of and engaged in the research of that particular field. In short, it shows that that you are participating in the "scholarly conversation." 

Use the NVU Libraries Citing Sources Research Guide to find helpful information on the major styles used at Northern Vermont University.
 

Where can I get writing help?

For help with writing, we recommend visiting the Writing Center or Academic Support Services offices on your home campus. Use the links below for more information.